Assistant Professor of Philosophy, General Faculty

Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
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Job description

Posting Number: 0623329
Location: Charlottesville
Department: Department of Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy seeks applications to fill an Assistant Professor position on the Academic General Faculty (tenure-ineligible) during the 2018-2019 academic year. Compensation will take the form of part-time salary with part-time benefits. Applicants must be on track to receive a Ph.D. in Philosophy by June 2018 and must hold the terminal degree at the time of appointment. Anticipated courses are Introduction to Philosophy and courses in ancient philosophy. Competence in ancient philosophy preferred. Candidates must have a strong commitment to teaching.

How to apply

To apply, visit http://jobs.virginia.edu and search on Posting Number 0623329. Complete a Candidate Profile online and attach a curriculum vitae; cover letter emphasizing teaching experience and preparedness to teach; and contact information for three references. Applicant review begins June 21, 2018 and the position remains open until filled.

For questions regarding this position, contact Glenda S. Notman, Administrative Supervisor at 434-243-4041 or gsn4d@virginia.edu

For questions regarding the online application process, contact Rich Haverstrom at rkh6j@.virginia.edu

The University will perform background checks on all new hires prior to making a final offer of employment.

The University of Virginia is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, veterans and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

University of Virginia

Thomas Jefferson founded the University of Virginia in 1819. He wished the publicly-supported school to have a national character and stature. Jefferson envisioned a new kind of university, one dedicated to educating leaders in practical affairs and public service rather than for professions in the classroom and pulpit exclusively. It was the first nonsectarian university in the United States and the first to use the elective course system.